Aviva Fund Centre

Welcome to the Aviva fund centre. If you haven’t already, please read our 'introduction to the fund centre' for important information about our range of funds. If you’re unsure of how to use the fund tools, please read our guide on how to use the fund centre.

Each of our funds has a ‘fund factsheet', you can see this by clicking on the fund name. This gives you detailed information about what the fund invests in, its objectives and performance. To help you understand the information fully, please read our guide to the fund factsheets:

These pages are for information only and should not be considered as a financial promotion. Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the data, it should not be relied upon for buying and selling decisions.

The past performance figures we show are not a guide to what will happen to your investments in the future. The value of an investment in a fund and any income from it are not guaranteed and can go down as well as up, depending upon the underlying investment performance and currency exchange rates. Depending on how your funds perform, your investment value may be less than the amount you originally invested.

Life and pensions - Your Guide to fund factsheets
We recommend you speak to a financial adviser before you make any investment decisions.

Aviva Fondszentrum

Willkommen im Aviva-Fondszentrum!

Jeder unserer Fonds hat ein „Factsheet“, das Sie einsehen können, indem Sie auf den Fondsnamen klicken. Es bietet Ihnen detaillierte Informationen über die Investitionsobjekte des Fonds, seine Ziele und Performance. Um Ihnen das vollständige Verständnis dieser Informationen zu erleichtern, lesen Sie bitte unseren Leitfaden zu den Fonds-Factsheets.

Diese Seiten dienen lediglich zu Informationszwecken und stellen keine Verkaufsförderung für Instrumente zur Geldanlage dar. Obwohl alle Anstrengungen unternommen werden, die Richtigkeit der Daten zu gewährleisten, sollten Sie sich bei Ihren Kauf- und Verkaufsentscheidungen nicht darauf verlassen.

Die von uns dargestellten Performance-Zahlen der Vergangenheit sind kein Anhaltspunkt für die zukünftige Entwicklung Ihrer Investitionen. Der Wert einer Anlage in einen Fonds und die daraus resultierenden Erträge sind nicht garantiert und können je nach Anlageerfolg und Wechselkursen sowohl steigen als auch fallen. Abhängig von der Entwicklung Ihrer Geldanlage kann deren Wert auch unter dem ursprünglich investierten Betrag liegen.

Lebens und Rentenversicherungen – Ihr Leitfaden für Fonds-Factsheets
Wir empfehlen Ihnen, sich an einen Finanzberater zu wenden, bevor Sie Anlageentscheidungen treffen.

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All performance figures take into account the actual fund charge or an indicative net charge. The indicative net charge is equivalent to the charge that applies to most new customers investing in the funds. This may not be exactly the same as the charge that applies to your investment so the performance may not be the same. Please see the fund factsheet for confirmation of what charges are included in the performance.

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Source of performance data: FE

Fund name/Factsheet

Fund name

In the fund list below, you’ll see the words at the end of the fund name such as ‘S13’ or ‘(CGU)’. This indicates the fund series. If a fund has more than one series there may be a difference in the unit prices and charges. Your annual statement will indicate which fund series your plan belongs to, or you can check it against our list of products: Life products Pension products

Factsheet

Each of our funds has a fund factsheet to help you understand more about it. The factsheet contains key information about the fund, from what it invests in to how it has performed. Please make sure you read the guid to your fund factsheet: Life and Pensions - Your guide to fund factsheets

% Growth

The purpose of a fund is to grow your investments, although there is also a chance the value of your investment can fall. This tab shows the performance over a number of time periods from the very short term (under a year) to the longer term (up to five years). The past performance figures we show are not a guide to what will happen to your investments in the future. The fund values are not guaranteed and can go down as well as up. Depending on how your funds perform, your fund value may be less than the amount you originally invested.

The figures are updated daily, excluding bank holidays and weekends. Where we show cumulative performance, we use the unit price from the previous working day. We don’t provide past performance information for funds with less than 12 months performance.

Selling price

Depending on the product you bought, we quote two prices for some funds. The buying price is the price you pay when you buy units/shares from us. The selling price is the price we buy them back from you if you choose to sell your investment (e.g. switch out of the fund).

Buying price

Depending on the product you bought, we quote two prices for some funds. The buying price is the price you pay when you buy units/shares from us. The selling price is the price we buy them back from you if you choose to sell your investment (e.g. switch out of the fund).

Fund manager

These are the people or teams responsible for the fund’s investment strategy and managing its activity.

Investment fund type

Aviva categorises its funds into ‘investment fund types’. Each fund defined as a particular ‘type’ will have similar characteristics. For example, funds in the Equities category will mainly invest in equities. Some funds may also belong to more than one category. For example, an equity fund that aims to follow a specific stock market index will also be in the 'Tracker' category. You can view our investment fund type definitions on our ‘important information’ page.

Extra management charge/additional yearly charge

With certain funds you’ll have to pay an extra charge; this reflects the extra cost of managing these funds. The charge you'll pay will vary depending on the fund you choose. For bond customers: for funds with a guarantee, the extra charge will only apply up to the guarantee point.

Fund Manager Expense Charge (FMEC)

FMECs are additional charges that cover the fund manager’s expenses connected with buying, selling, valuing, owning and maintaining the assets in the funds. This charge is taken into account in the unit price. FMECs may vary from year to year.

Total Additional Yearly Charge

This is the total sum of the extra management charge/additional yearly charge and any fund manager expense charge (FMEC).

Annual Charge

This charge is taken into account in the buying or selling price (see ‘Price’ tab).

Alpha

Alpha is a measure of a fund's over- or under-performance by comparison to its benchmark. It represents the return of the fund when the benchmark is assumed to have a return of zero, and thus indicates the extra value that the manager's activities have contributed: if the Alpha is 5, the fund has outperformed its benchmark by 5% and the greater the Alpha, the greater the out performance.

The figures shown are calculated over 3 years to the last month end.

Beta

Beta is a measure of a fund’s volatility (standard deviation) relative to that of its benchmark, i.e. how sensitive the fund is to movements in the section of the market that comprises the benchmark.

A positive Beta indicates that the fund moves broadly in the same direction as the benchmark, while a negative Beta indicates that a fund will move in the opposite direction to the benchmark. For example, a fund with a Beta close to 1 will have experienced movements broadly in line with the benchmark, whilst a fund with a Beta of 1.2 suggests that the movement of the fund is 1.2 times that of the benchmark.

The figures shown are calculated over 3 years to the last month end.

Sharpe

This is a commonly-used measure which calculates the level of a fund's return over and above the return of a notional risk-free investment, such as cash or Government bonds. The difference in returns is then divided by the fund's standard deviation - its volatility, or risk measurement. The resulting ratio is an indication of the amount of excess return generated per unit of risk. The higher the Sharpe ratio, the better the portfolio’s risk adjusted performance.

The figures shown are calculated over 3 years to the last month end.

Volatility

Standard Deviation is a commonly used measure of risk. Specifically, it measures the variability of actual returns from their expected (average) values and the dispersion of these variations over time.

The higher the standard deviation the wider the dispersions from their mean, and generally, the greater the risk due to the lower predictability of returns. For example, if a fund had an average return of 5%, and its volatility was 15, this would mean that the range of its returns over the period had swung between +20% and -10%. Another fund with the same average return and 5% volatility would return between 10% and nothing.

Standard Deviation is more commonly referred to as volatility.

The figures shown are calculated over 3 years to the last month end.

Aviva Risk Rating

To help you decide which investment funds to invest in, we give each one a risk/return rating, ranging from 1 (Lowest Volatility) to 7 (Highest Volatility). This table explains what each rating means.

Risk Rating Fund type
7 Highest Funds typically investing in the highest risk sectors, such as specific themes or shares of companies in emerging markets. These funds offer the highest potential for long-term returns, but also experience the largest day-to-day price movements compared to other funds. They therefore present the highest risk to your investment.
6 High Funds typically investing in high-risk sectors, such as shares of companies in developed overseas markets. These funds offer high potential for long-term returns, but also experience large day-to-day price movements, and so present a high risk to your investment.
5 Medium to High Funds typically investing in shares of companies in the UK or a mix of other major stock markets. Fund prices may move up and down significantly but offer potential for good returns over the long term.
4 Medium Funds typically investing in a mix of assets with the potential for better long-term returns than lower risk funds. There is a greater risk that the value of your investment could fall.
3 Low to Medium Funds typically investing in assets like corporate bonds or a mix of assets where the day-to-day prices go up or down less than shares. There is still a risk that the value of your investment could fall.
2 Low Funds typically investing in assets like the highest quality corporate bonds, which normally offer better long-term returns than savings accounts. There is still a risk that the value of your investment could fall.
1 Lowest Funds typically investing in the lower risk sectors – like the money market – which usually aim to provide returns similar to those available from deposit and savings accounts. These funds offer the lowest potential for long-term returns, but also experience the smallest day-to-day price movements compared to other funds. They present the lowest risk to your investment, although there is still a risk it could fall in value.

Please note: We regularly review the ratings we give to each investment fund. So they might change from time to time. Our fund centre will show the current rating of a particular fund.

Fund manager initial charge

This is the charge you pay when you invest in a fund. It is a percentage of the share/unit price, which you pay on top of the purchase price for the shares or units. For example, if you invested £10,000 into a fund with a 5% initial charge, you would actually invest £9,500 after the charge is taken from your investment.

Discounted initial charge

This is the fund management initial charge after we’ve negotiated with the fund manager. We can usually negotiate a lower charge, but often succeed in bringing the charge down to nothing.

Fund manager annual management charge

This charge pays for the ongoing annual costs of managing the fund, including administration and investment expertise. It is a percentage of the value of the fund.

Fund Status

Open – This means the fund is open to new investments, including switches and future regular payments.

Closed to new money – This means the fund is closed to all new investments, including switches, single payments and future regular payments. For Platform customers the fund will continue to accept transfers through re-registration of units already held in this fund.

Closing soon – This means the fund will soon close to all new investments (including switches and future regular payments) and also close to existing investments. We will write to you if you are already invested in this fund, to give you your options.

Deferred - This means investors won’t be able to sell or switch out of the Fund. It is a temporary deferment of payments out of the Fund. Any regular contributions for this fund will continue as normal.

% Change

This is the percentage increase/decrease in the price of a single unit/share compared to the previous day.

Fund sector

Every fund will belong to a fund sector. Each fund in a particular sector will usually have similar characteristics. Knowing what sector your funds are in lets you compare one fund with another of a similar nature. However, funds in the specialist or unclassified sectors do not have common characteristics, and comparison to other funds or the sector performance is not appropriate. Life and Pensions fund sectors are set by the ABI and have regulatory restrictions. Collective investment fund sectors are set by the IMA.

OCF/TER

In addition to the Aviva platform charge, fund managers will also take charges that will depend on the investments chosen. These charges may be shown as the ongoing charge figure (OCF) total expense ratio (TER) or for insured funds, simply the annual fund charge. These cover the charge made by the fund manager for managing the investment as well as expenses incurred by the fund. Please note these charges are variable and may change over time.

Key Information Document (KID)

The Key Information Document (KID) viewable below is for the SELECT INVESTMENT PRODUCT ONLY.

Please do not use it for the other Life products listed as the information is not relevant to them.

Underlying Investment Option Documents (UIOD)

The Underlying Investment Option Documents (UIOD) viewable below are for the SELECT INVESTMENT PRODUCT ONLY.

Please do not use them for the other Life products listed as the information is not relevant to them.

Risk Warnings

These highlight the risks these fund can be exposed to at any given time. Definitions of these risks can be found on the last page.

A - General

Investment is not guaranteed: The value of an investment is not guaranteed and can go down as well as up. You could get back less than you have paid in.

Specialist funds: Some funds invest only in a specific or limited range of sectors and this will be set out in the fund’s aim. These funds may carry more risk than funds that can invest across a broader range or a variety of sectors.

Suspend trading: Fund managers often have the ability, in certain circumstances, to suspend trading in their funds for as long as necessary. When this occurs, we will need to delay the ‘cashing in’ or switching of units in the relevant fund. You may not be able to access your money during this period.

Derivatives: Derivatives are financial contracts whose value is based on the prices of other assets. Most funds can invest in derivatives for the purpose of managing the fund more efficiently or reducing risk. Some funds also use derivatives to increase potential returns, known as ‘speculation’. For those funds we apply an additional risk warning (see Risk F).

B - Foreign Exchange Risk

When funds invest in overseas assets the value will go up and down in line with movements in exchange rates as well as the changes in value of the fund’s holdings.

C - Emerging Markets

Where a fund invests in emerging markets, its value is likely to move up and down by large amounts and more frequently than one that invests in developed markets. These markets may not be as strictly regulated and securities may be harder to buy and sell than those in more developed markets. These markets may also be politically unstable which can result in the fund carrying more risk.

D - Smaller Companies

Where a fund invests in the shares of smaller companies, its value is likely to move up and down by large amounts and more frequently than one that invests in larger company shares. The shares can also be more difficult to buy and sell, so smaller companies funds can carry more risk.

E - Fixed Interest

Where a fund invests in fixed interest securities, such as company, government, index-linked or convertible bonds, changes in interest rates or inflation can contribute to the value of the investment going up or down. For example, if interest rates rise, the value is likely to fall.

F - Derivatives

Derivatives are financial contracts whose value is based on the prices of other assets. The fund invests in derivatives as part of its investment strategy, over and above their use for managing the fund more efficiently. Under certain circumstances, derivatives can result in large movements in the value of the fund and increase the risk profile, compared to a fund that only invests in, for example, equities. The fund may also be exposed to the risk that the company issuing the derivative may not honour their obligations, which could lead to losses.

G - Cash/Money Market Funds

These are different to cash deposit accounts and their value can fall. Also, in a low interest rate environment the product or fund charges may be greater than the return, so you could get back less than you have paid in.

H - Property Funds

The fund invests substantially in property funds, property shares or direct property. You should bear in mind that.

  • Properties are not always readily saleable and this can lead to times in which clients are unable to ‘cash in’ or switch part or all of their holding and you may not be able to access your money during this time.
  • Property valuations are made by independent valuers, but are ultimately subjective and a matter of judgement.
  • Property transaction costs are high due to legal costs, valuations and stamp duty, which will affect the fund’s returns.
I - High Yield Bonds

The fund invests in high yield (non-investment grade) bonds. Non-investment grade bonds carry a higher risk that the issuer may not be able to pay interest or return capital. In addition, economic conditions and interest rate movements will have a greater effect on their price. There may be times when these bonds are not easy to buy and sell. In exceptional circumstances, we may need to delay the ‘cashing in’ or switching of units in the fund and you may not be able to access your money during this period.

J - Reinsured Funds

Where a fund invests in an underlying fund operated by another insurance company through a reinsurance agreement, if the other insurance company were to become insolvent, you could lose some or all of the value of your investment in this fund.

Product name

If you’re an existing customer and you’re unsure which product you’re invested in, check your annual statement or give us a call

Fund group

All funds are run by an ‘asset management’ company. Aviva uses a range of asset management companies to provide funds to you.

Fund series

In the fund lists below, you’ll see the words at the end of the fund name such as ‘S13’ or ‘CGU’. This indicates the fund series. If a fund is in more than one series there may be a difference in the unit prices and charges. Your annual statement will indicate which fund series your plan belongs to, or you can check it against our list of products: Life products Pension products Collective investments

ABI fund sector

Every fund will belong to a fund sector. Each fund in a particular sector will usually have similar characteristics. Knowing what sector your funds are in lets you compare one fund with another of a similar nature. However, funds in the specialist or unclassified sectors do not have common characteristics, and comparison to other funds or the sector performance is not appropriate. Life and Pensions fund sectors are set by the ABI and have regulatory restrictions.

IA fund sector

Every fund will belong to a fund sector. Each fund in a particular sector will usually have similar characteristics. For example, invest in a specific geographic region, e.g. Europe. Knowing what sector your funds are in lets you compare one fund with another of a similar nature. However, funds in the specialist or unclassified sectors do not have common characteristics, and comparison to other funds or the sector performance is not appropriate. Collective investment fund sectors are set by the IA.

Quick fund search

Please be as exact as possible to ensure all relevant funds appear.

Life

Our ‘Life’ products are investment bonds, unitised endowments and Whole of Life.

Collective investments

This covers investments such as OEICs and Unit Trusts.

All performance figures take into account the actual fund charge or an indicative net charge. The indicative net charge is equivalent to the charge that applies to most new customers investing in the funds. This may not be exactly the same as the charge that applies to your investment so the performance may not be the same. Please see the fund factsheet for confirmation of what charges are included in the performance.

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